Just as ORGANO™ has transformed into a Global Family, Easter has transformed into an international secular festival – manifested in trademark symbols like cotton tailed bunnies, eggs, and lots of candy.  Traditionally a religious holiday celebrating the rebirth of Christ, Easter has become a celebration for families to enjoy together – worldwide. Join ORGANO™ today as we celebrate the onset of spring, Easter, bunnies and their colored eggs.

The Goddess of Spring and Fertility & The Movable Feast: While it is not quite clear where the name Easter originated from, but it is believed that it could be associated with Eostre, the Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility.  In addition, Easter falls on the Sunday following the vernal equinox, typically ranging between March 22nd and April 25th.  And, because it does not have a set date each year, it is sometimes called the movable feast.  While most countries recognize Easter as a public holiday, some countries like Denmark, Norway, and Iceland extend the festivities associated with the holiday to include Good Friday and continue through Easter until the following Monday.

The Colored Egg Laying Hare & His Friends the Fox, Chicken and Rooster: Rabbits, associated with new life and fertility in ancient lore, have connections to the Easter holiday that can be traced back to the Protestants in Europe during the 17th century.  Word of the fabled bunny spread to America when German immigrants settled in Pennsylvania and told stories of an colored egg-laying hare. Children would construct nests for the bunny to leave his colored eggs; and in return they would sometimes leave him carrots to nibble – certain he would be tired from the miles of hopping. As the custom spread across the country, the rabbit’s presents expanded to include chocolate eggs and marshmallows, and over time the nest were replaced with baskets. In countries like Australia and certain areas in Germany, children don’t receive a visit from a bunny, rather a fox, chick, rooster, or bilby (desert dwelling rabbit) is the provider of the tasty treats!

The Easter Egg; Hard to Boil & Colors to Dye For: Similar to the bunny, Easter eggs are associated with new life and fertility as well, and the tradition of decorating eggs can be traced back to the 17th century.  During the Lenten (period of penitence and fasting) season leading up to Easter Sunday, eggs were a forbidden food in Europe.  People would paint and decorate eggs as a mark of the end of the period of fasting, then eat them in celebration on Easter Sunday.  Some of the most revered Easter eggs are Faberge eggs, jewel encrusted eggs created for the Russian Imperial Court during the late 19th century.  The U.S. White House Easter Egg Roll is an annual tradition that began in 1878 in which children roll decorated, hard boiled eggs across the White House lawn.

Somewhere Over The Rainbow & Put All Your ORGANO™ in One Basket: While it is never a good idea to “put all of your eggs in one basket” as relates to life in general, that is not the case when it comes to the wide variety of ORGANO™ Gourmet Coffee and Tea Blends available today – perfect for gift giving on global holidays. There is no greater way to savor the holiday with family and friends than over a steaming hot cup of coffee or, since it is officially spring – and ice cold cup of OG Tea! And, in the spirit of the holiday (and the advent of springtime) a drop of food coloring (in every color of the rainbow) in any one of OG’s Gourmet Tea Blends – it’s a great way to embrace the season and your guests!

Today is a day to reflect on the true meaning of the holiday, carry on the traditions of Easter and officially welcome spring. And, if you need a little “pick me up” after a long egg hunt – put a little ORGANO™ in your step (and in your basket), with any one of our Gourmet Blends or Single Serve Brew Cups. And remember …if you get melted chocolate all over your hands, you’re eating it too slow. Happy Easter from the ORGANO™ Global Family to Yours!

Sources:

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/history-of-easter

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/easter-symbols